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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: Approximately 15% of patients have developed immune responses (antibodies) to Cerezyme during the first year of therapy. These patients have a higher risk of an allergic reaction (hypersensitivity). Your doctor may periodically test for the presence of antibodies. Serious allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have been reported in less than 1% of patients... View more

Treatment with Cerezyme

Cerezyme is typically given by infusion for 1-2 hours every 2 weeks. Your doctor will determine your Cerezyme dose and frequency.

Cerezyme is given by intravenous (IV) infusion

Cerezyme is given by intravenous (IV) solution

This is a process that involves injecting the drug into a vein, directly into the bloodstream. Like other protein-based medications, Cerezyme cannot be taken orally as a pill or liquid because proteins are destroyed in the digestive system. Infusion into the bloodstream bypasses your body’s digestive processes.

Your doctor will determine your Cerezyme dose and frequency. Your dose is individualized based on your weight and disease severity. The most common dosing schedule for Cerezyme is 60 units per kilogram of body weight, every 2 weeks.

What to expect from Cerezyme treatment

Cerezyme is an ERT (enzyme replacement therapy) designed to reduce the accumulation of a fatty substance called GL-1 in the spleen, liver, and bones. The build-up of GL-1 ultimately causes the signs and symptoms of Gaucher disease. Cerezyme has helped adults and children with Gaucher disease type 1 by improving key disease symptoms over the long term.

Studies show that Cerezyme treatment helped people with Gaucher disease type 1 by improving certain disease symptoms

As with any medicine, there may be potential side effects with Cerezyme. You should notify your doctor immediately if you experience any side effects while undergoing treatment with Cerezyme.

During treatment

Cerezyme is a long-term part of treatment for Gaucher disease type 1, as your body requires regular infusions of enzyme to reduce the GL-1 build-up in cells that can lead to Gaucher symptoms. You will receive biweekly infusions of Cerezyme, and will need ongoing appointments and tests to help doctors keep track of your progress.

During Cerezyme infusions
Cerezyme infusions may last from one to two hours and can be completed in a variety of settings, such as a doctor’s office, a treatment center, or in some cases, home. During your infusion, you can do things like read a book, talk on the phone, listen to music, visit with friends or family members who are with you — even take a nap if you wish.

Regular tests to check your progress
Certain tests will be required to check your progress and provide a way for your doctor to gain insight into the status of your disease and disease-management plan. Your doctor will decide which tests you need and how frequently you need them. These tests may include assessments of your spleen and liver, blood, and bones.

To understand your part in disease management, monitoring, and testing for Gaucher disease type 1, learn more at GaucherCare.com.

Staying on treatment

Although Cerezyme is not a cure for Gaucher disease type 1, regular treatment can help reduce or relieve some signs and symptoms. In order to continue to benefit from the treatment, you need to receive ongoing intravenous infusions, even though you may feel better. If therapy stops, Gaucher cells may build up again and symptoms may come back.

Treatment planning tips

Treatment planning tips

If your infusions need to occur during work hours, or if your child’s infusions need to occur during school hours, you may decide to inform employers, teachers and others about the importance of regular infusions. This is an important decision and you may want to talk with your healthcare provider about it.

Managing Cerezyme treatment

If you miss an infusion, talk to your doctor about rescheduling your appointment. It may be necessary for you to plan ahead if you will be moving or traveling, so that you don’t miss an infusion. Talk with your doctor or support services about the potential for arranging for treatment at your destination.

There may be risks associated with pregnancy

If you are on Cerezyme and are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant, be sure to talk to your doctor. There may be risks associated with staying on Cerezyme during pregnancy. Be sure to tell your doctor if you are breast feeding.

Develop a treatment plan while you are away

Treatment with Cerezyme does not mean you should stop all daily activities. If an opportunity arises for you to take a vacation, go to camp, attend college, or make a permanent move, talk to your doctor about developing a plan for treatment while you are away.

Help is available

After consulting with your doctor about your plans, contact support services for additional help.

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What is Cerezyme?

How can Cerezyme help?

Studied for organ, blood, and certain bone symptoms in
Gaucher disease type 1

See the results

Indication & Usage

Cerezyme® (imiglucerase for injection) is indicated for long-term enzyme replacement therapy for pediatric and adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Type 1 Gaucher disease that results in one or more of the following conditions:

  • anemia (low red blood cell count)
  • thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet count)
  • bone disease
  • hepatomegaly or splenomegaly (enlarged liver or spleen)

Important Safety Information

Approximately 15% of patients have developed immune responses (antibodies) to Cerezyme during the first year of therapy. These patients have a higher risk of an allergic reaction (hypersensitivity). Your doctor may periodically test for the presence of antibodies. Serious allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have been reported in less than 1% of patients. Symptoms suggestive of allergic reaction happened in approximately 7% of patients, and include itching, flushing, hives, swelling, chest discomfort, shortness of breath, coughing, cyanosis (a bluish discoloration of the skin due to diminished oxygen), and low blood pressure. If you have had an allergic reaction to Cerezyme, you and your doctor should use caution if you continue to receive treatment with Cerezyme.

High blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs (pulmonary hypertension) and pneumonia have been observed in less than 1% of patients during treatment with Cerezyme. These are also known complications of Gaucher disease regardless of treatment. If you experience symptoms such as shortness of breath or chest pain, with or without fever, contact your doctor.

Approximately 14% of patients have experienced side effects related to treatment with Cerezyme. Some of these reactions occur at the site of injection such as discomfort, itching, burning, swelling or uninfected abscess. Other side effects, each of which was reported by less than 2% of patients, include nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, fatigue, headache, fever, dizziness, chills, backache, and rapid heart rate. Temporary swelling in the legs has also been observed with drugs like Cerezyme.

Please see Full Prescribing Information (PDF).